The Beast of Primarette

The Beast of Primarette is not really a top drawer Premier League monster, so the first port of call will have to be the French version of Wikipedia. Here is my own translation:

“The “Beast of Primarette” was a man eating animal responsible for a series of attacks on humans in the vicinity of the village of Primarette in the south east of France. The first attack took place in the spring of 1747. Between then and the end of the winter in 1752, seven victims were identified in the parish registers.”

Primarette is a tiny village in south eastern France. On this map, it is represented by a red dot. The orange arrow is on holiday, but not in France:Untitled

In 1747, François Malarin, the village priest of Primarette, reported the very violent death of a little boy in his parish :

“In the year 1747 and on the 23rd of May, the Tuesday of Whitsuntide, during the service of Vespers, a carnivorous wolf (loup carnassier) seized the child of François Malarin from the door of their house in the presence of his mother. She was unable to snatch the child back from the animal’s teeth. Several people returning from Vespers heard the story of this misfortune and ran into the woods, following the trail of blood left behind by the child. They found some of his limbs scattered on the ground including the head, the arms, an upper leg and a foot. These body parts were all buried in the presence of Michel and Gabriel Perrochat, father and son, Antoine Jeury, Jean Bassat, Claude Berthier and several other people who had rushed to see this sad sight. The child, aged around seven years and one month old, was the legitimate son of François Malarin from Espagnoux and Fleurice Petit. Whereof I have signed, not the witnesses, who do not know how to write.

                                         Favre the Priest.

An “x” is appended by Michel Malarin as a supplementary act.”

A sketch is in existence:

150 wolf child

This beast, most un-wolf-like in its behaviour, was later to claim several more victims, and the priest reported later that year the level of emotion aroused by these incidents. In the Parish Register of 1747 he wrote therefore:

“There have been this year a large crop of acorns, and carnivorous wolves have eaten three children in Primarette. It is believed that they were most probably lynxes and the common people believe that they are werewolves. Until the priests give the peasants permission to carry out hunts armed with pairs of spectacles, nothing will be able to cure their stupid credulity.”

Below is the original parish register entry, in French, of the paragraph translated above. See if you can pick out any words, such as “loups”, “carnassiers”, “loups garous” or any other words. I can’t imagine any reader would be expecting to manage to read French written by long dead Favre the Priest in 1747. Nor indeed, would he be expecting anybody to still be reading his words in 2015:

800px-Primarette-1747-9NUM_AC324A_6-p48

Here is a werewolf, a “loup garou” filmed by a trailcam in Wisconsin:

werewolf

The last victim within the bounds of the parish of Primarette was found in 1752, but nobody was ever able to identify the animal responsible for all these attacks.

Here is a very large wolf. It will calm you down after the werewolf. This animal was filmed by a trailcam in northern Scotland:

wolf bounding
Here is a list of the poor victims:

May 23rd 1747                       Michel Malarin, 7 years of age
June 1st 1747                          Joseph Fournier, 13 years of age
October 24th 1747                 Mathieu Roux, 5 years of age
October 11th 1748                 Benoite Pichon, 2 years of age
January 23rd 1749                Marie Peiron, 6 years of age
May 14th 1751                        Jeanne Fervonat, years of age
February 19th 1752               Marianne Boindrieux, 3 years of age

Another French website suggests that mention of the huge number of acorns, and the presence of man eating wolves may be connected in the minds of the locals at Primarette. Perhaps they had some kind of superstition about this.
It is unfortunate that no description of the beast seems to have survived, although I would continue to argue that if the locals in this area thought that all the deaths in the area were caused by lynxes or werewolves, then that in itself lends credence to the idea that it was no ordinary wolf, an animal with which they would have been only too familiar. Favre the Priest tried hard to give people in the distant future some idea, adding little sketches to the side of his manuscript:

1747-38-Primarette-A1737a wolf

Here is a pair of wolf’s heads:

two wolves

I have enlarged some of the sketches. Again, you may be able to read some of Favre the Priest’s words:

wolf sketch

Here is a second head, with the name “Marianne Boindrieux”:

another wolf sketch

See if you can see the signature of Favre the Priest (“curé”):

more and more wolfsxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

This cryptid did not behave like an ordinary wolf. A wolf does not attack people at their front door. I’m not sure either, that a wolf would run off, dismembering its victim, and scattering body parts around, almost in sheer glee. And why did the same individual wolf remain in this area from May 23rd 1747 to February 19th 1752? Or was it a number of individuals from a local population, all with the same deviant behaviour? Members of a different species, in fact? “Like a wolf, but not a wolf.”

In so many cases like this, the original French text calls the animals “loups carnassiers”. “Carnassiers” means “carnivorous” or “predatory”. Why do they keep appending this epithet to the word “loup”?

And how on earth can  this continuing series of creatures continue to be explained away either by the nefarious activities of Jean Chastel and his sons, or the accidental interbreeding of wolf and dog? It has become a truism nowadays to say that “wolves don’t interbreed with dogs. They eat them.”

And what happened to the Beast of Primarette after 1752? Did it take early retirement?

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12 Comments

Filed under Cryptozoology, France, History, Science, Wildlife and Nature

12 responses to “The Beast of Primarette

  1. and some people want to reintroduce wolves into Scotland – that will make highland holidays interesting!

  2. I’m beginning to think it’s not safe outside! So many weird and ferocious animals!

    • Don’t get too scared! This was a very long time ago! More seriously, this is exactly the reason that I believe that there must have been some now-extinct, wolf-like killer out there, for all these deaths to have occurred. Certainly, ordinary wolves don’t behave like these animals did.

  3. John, nice creepy article. I am interested in the correlation between the true and fictionalized. That is, I am sure most countries have a type of predator wolf account which is retold into a fictional story, like Cinderella, to keep order and make kids behave. Peter and the Wolf, for instance.

  4. That’s really interesting.There are plenty of stories where the wolf is the baddie, yet real wolves, nowadays, don’t behave like that. Perhaps I am right, and, centuries ago, there was another species that was lots fiercer than the wolf, but similar enough to be difficult for many people to identify. Here in England, the most dangerous animal remains the dog (by a mile) followed by cattle, especially Friesians, and deer, which kill thirty or so people annually, always in traffic accidents. Bill Bryson hates moose, so it may be roughly the same in the USA!

  5. Even if that sketch is roughly accurate that is a big animal compared to that unfortunate child. It’s amazing how many of these creatures/stories exist in France. Great work John. Very interesting

    • Thanks a lot for your kind words. I have wondered myself why so many of these Beasts seem to have existed in France, It may be that they were driven westwards out of the forests of central Europe for some unknown reason. It may just be that every French village had a priest who knew how to write, and he recorded everything he did, including funerals. I suspect also that the political stability of France also had a role to play. A lot of central and eastern Europe was made up of tiny duchies and princedoms that didn’t always last for very long, so records perhaps got lost.

  6. O-O-O-O-O-O Another creep one!!! Gee whizzers, John! You are going to give me nightmares! Are you getting warmed up for Halloween!!! LOL ❤

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