What would you do ? (1) The Puzzle

“What would you do ?” used to figure on the cover of a comic called “Boys’ World”. This was a publication, obviously, aimed at boys and first appeared on January 26th 1963, priced sixpence in pre-decimal money, two and a half pence in today’s money. There were 89 issues before the comic was merged with Eagle in 1964. The last issue of “Boys’ World” came out on October 3rd 1964. Here is the Eagle for that very same day. It seems to have swallowed “Boys’ World” without even noticing:

I used to buy “Boys’ World”, and this was mainly for the front cover which always featured a kind of puzzle. It was called “What would you do ?” and was based on somebody being in what Ned Flanders would call “A dilly of a pickle”. Here’s the great man:

Here’s the front cover with the situation for “What would you do ?”

The yellow box sets the scene, and the task is for you to solve the situation. Perhaps you might like to write your idea in the “Comments” section. Here’s the yellow box enlarged:

The monster crocodile has escaped and is thrashing about in the boat. The canoe’s occupants are threatened therefore with a capsize. There are more crocs in the water and there’s no time to use the rifle. There is, though, a clear need to act fast.

Both the picture of the situation and the yellow box can also be enlarged with a double click. I’ll be telling you the answer on December 5th. First prize is a chance to spend an evening Crocodile Rocking with Elton John, second prize is a stuffed thirteen foot crocodile and third prize is a thirteen foot crocodile which is not stuffed.

24 Comments

Filed under Film & TV, History, Humour, Literature, Personal, Writing

24 responses to “What would you do ? (1) The Puzzle

  1. Interesting quandary, I would like to know the name of the arsehole who placed me in that situation in the first place.
    Cheers.

  2. Now that is a dilly of a pickle isn’t it. Our hero obviously has a knife that he could plunge into the croc’s head, but that would upset animal rights activists. The net could be wrapped around its mouth, but that’s not strong enough to hold him, perhaps the man (sorry non gender person with male appendages) at the back could grab his tail and swing the beast round his head throwing him into the water a great distance away, or could our hero place his arm in the crocs mouth forcing its mouth to stay open thus saving them from being eaten. My head is now spinning faster than an Elton John 45! what does our hero do!

  3. I’m not sure it would work, but I’d probably take the oar and get him in the head as hard as possible. Then – I’d probably get frantic as he had me for lunch!!

    • “Close, but no cigar” as the saying has it. I didn’t answer this particular situation correctly, but having read the solution, I know that the oar is not used at any point. My own thought originally was to use it to jam his mouth (seconds before he had me for lunch as well!)

  4. First thing in the morning and you’ve got my head bursting with possibilities, John? What would I do? I think this would definitely be a team effort, firstly. The man in the black shirt would quick as lightning hit the gator over the head with the oar and the two others, while that gator was still stunned, grab the net and throw him overboard. I don’t think just one person could do the job.

  5. Sweet! You know, I bet it might be popular again if they updated it. But I like classic comics – the history, the artwork, the snapshot of time and the memories comic books bring out in the reader.

    • Yes, I love them. I have lots of modern DVDs full of the digitised images of old comics, all bought on ebay. There are also lots of art nouveau magazines out there, and illustrated Norse sagas that fit in perfectly with that golden age of German cinema in the early 1920s. And the artwork in almost all of them is just so beautiful!

  6. John, that’s definitely not a situation I’d like to be in! If you’re nimble, lightweight, and a fast runner, you could probably escape by using the backs of the crocodiles lined up in the river as a bridge to the riverbank.

  7. Jan

    In this situation there is only one solution: call International Rescue. FAB John.

  8. Jan

    Should International Resuce be otherwise engaged, I seem to recall that while a crocodile has just about the most powerful bite (3000lb per square inch) of any animal on the planet, the muscles that open the mouth are comparatively weak. So, judging by the disposition of the net I would knot it round the snout and await rescue by Hammy Hamster.

    • Ooh, that is so close, but not correct, I’m afraid,.
      I must admit, when the solution is revealed, it isn’t quite as strong a remedy as some of the other situations in later weeks, but that will be the one we’re going with.
      I have spent many years “awaiting rescue by Hammy Hamster”, but I am beginning to have occasional doubts about his existence. It’s all a case of how strong your faith is, I suppose.

  9. Chri Waller

    I was going to suggest exactly the same approach as Jan. Failing that I would jam the paddle into the croc’s mouth and wedge it open like the lid of a grand piano, although I have to confess it is a high risk strategy.

    • No, that’s an excellent idea, but not the approved solution. I too had always understood that crocodiles were completely stymied if you jammed their mouths open, so you get a Highly Commended”, rather than a fortnight’s trekking with Crocodile Dundee.

  10. Very interesting and the idea is continuing in all those prompts in WordPress. And crocodile reminded me of a photo in yesterday’s paper. Roasted crocodile in the Bangkok’s roadside eateries.
    Sir , I follow Todd Tyrtle in WordPress. You may like his blog. At present he is cycling in India.
    https://gooutsidetoday.com/2019/12/03/a-jam-packed-day-in-delhi/

  11. Thank you very much, I have opted to follow Todd Tyrtle and I look forward to seeing what he thinks of your wonderful country. Thanks again.

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